Swamp Birds: 14 Birds That Live In Swamps (With Photos)

 

Have you ever been near a swamp and seen a colorful bird flying overhead? If so, you may have encountered one of the many beautiful swamp birds that inhabit our planet. 

A swamp is a low-lying, wetland area that is teeming with life. These territories are home to a variety of plant and animal species, including many kinds of birds. Swamp birds are some of the most interesting and unusual creatures found there.

From the Belted Kingfisher to the Great Blue Heron, these birds have adapted to thrive in their wet, murky habitat.

If you’re interested in learning more about these fascinating creatures, read on for some fun facts about birds that live in wetlands.

Related articles:

14 Swamp Birds You Need To Know

Seabird Sanctuary is reader-supported. When you buy via the links on our site, we may earn an affiliate commission at no cost to you.

Belted Kingfisher

Belted Kingfisher

A stunning bird, the Belted Kingfisher can often be seen flying near rivers and shorelines. Blue-grey feathers, a white breast, and its large body distinguish this bird from others. 

Belted Kingfishers have one blue band across the breast in the male, and two blue and chestnut bands in the female. In comparison with its male counterpart, Belted Kingfishers’ female is brighter than those of other kingfisher species.

Normally, it burrows along earthen banks, and its main food source is fish and crayfish. With its heavy, straight bill, it catches its prey before diving into the water. 


Roseate Spoonbill

Roseate Spoonbill

Roseate Spoonbill lives in swamps and is one of the most fascinating birds. There are six species of spoonbill in the world, but only the roseate variety can be found in America.

Named for its spoon-shaped beak and vivid pink feathers, this bird has a unique and long beak. Scooping and filtering underwater insects from the muddy swamp waters is the spoonbill’s specialty.

Breeding season is an exciting time for these birds. During this time, its feathers turn a bright red colour. When they aren’t busy eating, roseate spoonbills often perch in the trees or wade through the shallows.


Great Egret

Great Egret

A heron is an egret, and the great egret is a little smaller than its cousin, the great blue heron. The great egret is more slender and has a longer neck.

This beautiful bird has long, thin legs and a long, S-shaped neck. The great egret hunts swamp waters for amphibians to stab them with its beak. As they move through shallow waters, they stand perfectly still, waiting for prey to come to them. 

As well as other coastal and swamp birds, the great egret nests in colonies with other species of bird.


Osprey

Osprey

Swamps are also home to ospreys, which are raptors. Their appearance is similar to that of a hawk. From small fish to other seabirds, it is able to consume a wide range of prey.

The Osprey is one of the few raptors that can hover in the air and then dive down to catch its prey. They have very sharp eyesight, which helps them to spot fish swimming in swamp waters from high up in the sky.

Besides diving from 100 feet above the ground, ospreys can reach speeds of up to 50 miles per hour before diving into the water.


Whooping Crane

Whooping Crane

Known for its whooping call, the whooping crane is a swamp bird. One of the most endangered birds in the world, they are one of the largest birds in the United States.

During the breeding season, whooping cranes build their nests in marshes and swamps. These nests are made from swamp vegetation and can be up to six feet wide. Nests of whooping cranes usually contain two to three eggs.

In the summer, the only flock of whooping cranes breeds in Canada, and in the winter they migrate to Texas. They are named for the short single bugle sound they produce from their long tracheas. Additionally, they will bugle in unison during their courtship dance.


Sandhill Crane

Sandhill Crane

A sandhill crane has a long neck and legs and is tall and slender. Their heads and eyes are covered in crimson masks. Wet areas and swamps are the habitats of sandhill cranes.

Sandhill cranes eat a variety of food, including bugs, plants, and small animals. In the wild, they live to be about 20 years old. These cranes are known for their deep rolling trumpet sound, which can be heard up to three miles away.

In the spring, their mating ritual involves a beautiful dance where they stretch their necks, bow, and call out to each other. Winters are spent inland by sandhill cranes, while summers are spent in swamps and marshes.


American Bittern

American Bittern

Birds of the swamp that hunt insects, amphibians, and fish in tall swamp grass are Bitterns, which are shy and secretive creatures. As with the American bittern, this species of heron inhabits shallow marshes and swamps where it can access diverse food sources.

The American bittern is a stocky bird with a long neck and bill. When it is alarmed, it will point its beak straight up in the air and freeze, making it very difficult to spot. This behavior earns the bird the nickname “stake driver.”

Bitterns rarely fly in the open. But their clacking and gulping calls are unmistakable. They blend into the swamp vegetation thanks to their dark brown stripes. The majority of the time, you will hear them before you see them.


Black-Necked Stilt

black neck stilt

Black-necked stilts are among the most unusual birds that live in swamps. Because its body is relatively small, this bird has very long legs. The stilt legs of their wings hang behind them when they fly.

As for color, it’s black and white. Swamps and shorelines are ideal nesting places for stilts. With their sharp, high-pitched keek call, the black-necked stilt can cause quite a commotion when disturbed.


Swamp Sparrow

Swamp Sparrow

The swamp sparrow lives among the reeds and cattails. The trills of their birdsong fill the swamp. Its long legs distinguish it from other sparrows, which have similar colors and appearances. 

A variety of Swamp Sparrows live in wetlands from central Canada to the eastern United States, where they sing a clear, mellifluous trill.

Swamp Sparrows may migrate to your yard even if it doesn’t have a wetland. Consider planting ferns, lilies, blueberries, and other lush ground covers near moisture if you want to succeed in this regard.


White Ibis

White Ibis

The white Ibis catches its prey in swamps, wetlands, and rivers with its curved bill. When an Ibis is around 14 days old, its straight bill begins to curve downward.

Ibis is a wading marsh bird that eats fish, frogs, lizards, and small mammals. It is a beautiful bird with its long neck, legs, and bill. The wingspan of this bird is about four feet.

The white ibis forages in shallow water and nests in trees along the shores and swamps in large colonies. Every year, they move to a new location. In yards and on lawns near swamps and marshes, it’s not uncommon to see White Ibis digging for insects. 


Green Heron

Green Heron

The green heron is a common bird found in swamps. In vegetation, they usually maintain a hunch-backed position. With their green feathers, they blend into the landscape and hunt fish along shorelines and shallow areas.

Green herons have a long neck, long legs, and a stocky body, and their long bill is used for stabbery. It has been observed that they use insects and sticks to lure prey. Aside from consuming amphibians and reptiles, it also eats small animals.


Clapper Rail

Clapper Rail

The Clapper Rail is a bird that is found in abundance in saltwater marshes and mangrove swamps from the U.S East Coast to Central America and the Caribbean. 

The bird spends most of its time hidden in dense vegetation due to its secretive nature. 

When young chicks leave the nest, their parents continue to brood them until they are around a week old. In addition to the original nest, the parents may construct temporary brood nests or use floating debris.


Greater Yellowlegs

Greater Yellowlegs

Greater Yellowlegs have dense, dark bands on their breasts and necks. It is quite impressive to see this bird breeding plumage. In most years, the back has a checkerboard pattern of speckling in black and white, and the neck and head are finely streaked. 

It has bright, white eyerings and some barring on its flanks, and a dark bill. Whenever the legs are in yellow plumage or orange in spring, they are appropriately bright yellow.

To chase aquatic prey, the Greater Yellowlegs occasionally break into a run across mudflats and marshes. Its wings are strong and swift, and its legs extend well beyond its tail. 


Great Blue Heron

Great Blue Heron

In swamps, the great blue heron is one of the most common birds. They are an integral part of a swamp’s ecosystem. The bird consumes fish, amphibians, and other swamp creatures.

In search of prey, great blue herons wade through shallow swamp water with their long necks and long legs. When they see an animal, they quickly thrust their head forward to snatch it up.

Herons are social creatures and often nest in colonies. A heron’s nest is a large platform of sticks built high in the trees. A single nest can hatch up to six blue-green eggs.


Conclusion

There you have it, 14 swamp birds list that call these murky habitats home. While some people may see swamps as dreary and dismal places, these birds certainly add a splash of color and life to them. 

The next time you’re out exploring a swamp, keep your eyes peeled for these feathered friends. Do you have any favorite swamp birds? Let us know in the comments below!

 

Leave a Comment